Mail Tribune 100, Dec. 24, continued


    News from 100 years ago

    The following news items were drawn from the archives of the Mail Tribune 100 years ago

    Dec. 24, 1918, continued

    COLONEL KELLY WRITES HE WILL SOON BE HOME

    The following letter from Lieut. Colonel E. E. Kelly to his wife and family here in Medford will be of great interest to his many friends in the city:

    Hd. D.S.O. 80th Div., APO, 756, November 23rd, 1918

    The division has been marching back out of the line the distance being about 150 miles. I came on ahead going by the way of Toul, Neufchateau and Chaumont, where I visited friends. The march will take seven or eight days yet and these headquarters will be at a little town called Ancy Le France, but do not address mail to this place, send it as usual.

    We are to be in a rest area pending the consummation of the armistice terms. Ten divisions are being sent home. Just when this division will go it is impossible to say. On the way down I visited my old friend, Gen. Gibbs of the signal corps and had a very nice visit. I also visited with one of the big moguls of our organization who said to me that the signal corps appreciated my work in France and that I was to have my choice of assignments that were available. I could go to Germany, or they would secure my appointment on some of the important commissions. I said to him; the war is over and there appears to be no possibility of a resumption of the hostilities. I want to remain as long only as there is an emergency, but I now feel that my first obligation is to my family and I therefore ask to be sent home at an early date. He said that can be arranged and you will be taken care of at the first opportunity. So it appears that I am to continue in the very fine streak of luck that has characterized my service here. I do not know when it will be that I will start but I am confident that it will not be very long at the most.

    Since the conclusion of hostilities the weather has been very fine with heavy frosts every night but the usual think of bright days. We are in a very pretty part of France (Old Burgundy) and not far from the scene of the surrender of the last Gaul to Caesar. I could have been billeted in a famous French chateau of the 16th century, a wonderful place, but the rooms were so large and cold that I preferred more comfortable but less pretentious quarters. Most anything seems good after the front line experience. I have very little to do just now and having settled will write every day until I am ordered elsewhere. It don’t seem possible that I will have a rest, I have been so busy since coming to France.

    EDWARD E. KELLY.

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