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Singers Tamara Daly, Carrie Lyn Brandon, Asha Brownie-Gordon, Kristen Calvin and Shae Celine perform in Oregon Cabaret Theatre's "Beehive: The '60s Musical." Photo by Bryon DeVore

Theater: Friday, Feb. 8

Collaborative Theatre Project: 555 Medford Center, Medford. Tickets and information are available at ctpmedford.org, by calling 541-779-1055 or at the box office. Group rates are available.

‘The Glass Menagerie’: Tennessee Williams’ portrait of a fragile young woman, her domineering mother and the brother who is a frustrated, aspiring poet is the memory play that made Williams famous. Lisa-Marie Newton plays Amanda Wingfield, an aging Southern belle who regales her children with talk of her genteel upbringing; Christian Mengel plays Tom, the son whose job at a shoe factory supports the family; and Hazel-Marie Werfel plays the delicate Laura, whose painful shyness is compounded by a leg brace. Tom invites the audience into a nagging memory that he must share or be forever haunted by the unrelenting presence of the home and family he left behind. Russell Lloyd directs. Curtain is at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Feb. 8-9, and 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 10. Tickets are $25, $20 for seniors and students, and $18 for ages 17 and younger.

Livia Genise Productions: Bellview Grange, 1050 Tolman Creek Road, Ashland. Tickets available at liviageniseproductions.org, or by cash or check at Paddington Station in Ashland. Oregon Trail cards will be accepted at the door.

‘A Tribute to the Life and Music of Rodgers & Hammerstein’: From 1943 thru 1956, Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II collaborated on some of the most powerful and influential musicals of the ‘40s and ‘50s, including “Oklahoma,” “Carousel,” “The King and I,” “South Pacific,” “Cinderella” and “The Sound of Music.” Their work together garnered them 34 Tony Awards, 15 Academy Awards, the Pulitzer Prize, and two Grammy Awards. Livia Genise, RenĂ©e Hewitt, David King-Gabriel and Derek Rosenlund present some of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s most popular songs from that period. They are backed up by Mark Reppert on musical direction and keyboards, Steve Fain on bass, Daryl Fjeldheim on sax, clarinet and flute, and Steve Sutfin on drums. Musical arrangements are by Brent Olstad with script by Charles Cherry. Show times are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays, Feb. 15-24. Tickets are $20.

Oregon Cabaret Theatre: First and Hargadine streets, Ashland. Tickets and information are available at theoregoncabaret.com or by calling 541-488-2902. Reservations are required for pre-show dinner and brunch. Appetizers, beverages and desserts are available without reservations. Student rush tickets are $10 and can be purchased 30 minutes before curtain. A 20 percent discount is available for groups of 10 or more.

‘Beehive: The ’60s Musical’: Told from the perspective of six young women who came of age in the enigmatic ’60s, this musical looks back on a range of topics from the girls’ first dance to the challenges the U.S. faced as a nation. Look for music by Aretha Franklin, Janis Joplin, Tina Turner, Diana Ross and Dusty Springfield. Lauren Blair directs. The show stars Rosharra Francis, Tamara Daly, Shae Celine, Asha Brownie-Gordon, Kristen Calvin and Carrie Lyn Brandon. Mike Wilkins, the musical director for OCT’s “Chicago,” “The All Night Strut” and “Once,” returns to lead a four-piece live band for Beehive. Choreography is by Keenon Hooks, costume design by Kristie Mattsson, scenic design by Jason Bolen, lighting design by Chris Wood and sound design by Kimberly Carbone. Curtain is at 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays and selected Mondays and Wednesdays, and 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, through March 31. Tickets cost $25, $36 or $39.

Outsider Theater: Tickets are available in advance at thelithiawaterdiaries.brownpapertickets.com or at the door.

‘The Lithia Water Diaries’: Ashland is full of stages ... and characters, and those characters will take the stage in “The Lithia Water Diaries,” a new play by writer Josh Gross that captures local culture with slice-of-life monologues you couldn’t hear anywhere else. It is in turns funny, shocking, heartwarming and provocative, using local archetypes to explore what it’s like to live in a multi-faceted community in the midst of rapid change. Gross directs, and Todd Lowenberg, Helen-Thea Marcus, Jordan Fernandez, Lauren Taylor, Chun-Han Chou and Hunter Prutch appear in the play. Shows are set for 8 p.m. Saturdays, Feb. 16 and 23, and 3 p.m. Sundays, Feb. 17 and 24, in the Ashland Community Center, 59 Winburn Way. Tickets are $10, $15 or $20.

Oregon Center for the Arts at Southern Oregon University: Theatre Arts Building, 491 S. Mountain Ave., Ashland. Tickets are available at oca.sou.edu/box-office or by calling 541-552-6348.

‘Elektra’: When King Agamemnon returns from the Trojan War with his new concubine, Cassandra, his wife Clytemnestra (who has taken Agamemnon’s cousin Aegisthus as a lover) kills them. Agamemnon’s daughter, Electra, and her younger brother, Orestes, plot their revenge, as well as claim to the throne. Sophocles’ ancient Greek tragedy is adapted by British playwright Timberlake Wertenbaker and retold in contemporary context. Penny Metropulos directs. Performances are set for 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, Feb. 21-23 and Feb. 28 through March 2, and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, March 2-3, in the Black Box Theatre. Tickets are $20, $15 for seniors and $5 for full-time students.

‘Hay Fever’: This cross of high farce and a comedy of manners set in midsummer at an English country manor follows a self-absorbed theatrical family that turns its clueless house guests into pawns in a game of misplaced desire and warped romance. Written in 1924, “Hay Fever” was Noel Coward’s first big hit, making him the first ambassador of “cool Britannia” at age 24. Scott Kaiser directs. Performances are set for 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, Feb. 28 through March 2 and March 7-9, and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, March 9-10. Tickets are $20, $15 for seniors and $5 for full-time students.

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