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Letters to the Editor, Aug. 16

Graham could do better

As a Christian, I was appalled by Franklin Graham’s request that his hearers pray for one political candidate facing re-election “to become a Christian.” To me, that was Christianity at its worst: an underhanded political message in a spiritual event.

In a time when so many Americans seem to think Christians come in only one political color, we need to remember that Jesus called his followers to primary loyalty to the kingdom of God, which supersedes loyalty to any government or political party. I wish Graham had asked those 12,000 hearers to pray instead for elected officials in both parties who truly know God and seek God’s will to have the courage to stand up for honesty, truth, justice and compassion in our current toxic political environment. Shame on you, Franklin! And shame on any Christian from that congregation who lets his remark influence your vote.

Patricia Sprinkle

Medford

If hypocrites could fly

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) provided access to health care for many Americans to whom it wasn’t previously available. This included treatment for opiate addiction, which has become epidemic.

An article in the May 21 Mail Tribune, focused on the opiate problem, was based on information provided by Congressman Greg Walden at his office. Walden had a great deal to say and tried to give the impression that he was very concerned about the suffering caused by opiate addiction. What he didn’t say, however, tells us much more.

Walden and other congressional Republican health care thieves have worked tirelessly to destroy the ACA and its access to health care, including drug treatment. They are also trying to eliminate coverage for pre-existing conditions. Everyone who is addicted already has a pre-existing condition. Walden’s concern for the suffering of others was disingenuous.

If hypocrites could fly, our congressman would be an astronaut.

Victor Mlotok

Phoenix

Why I’m running

Ashland, Oregon, is well known for diversity, free thought and free speech. What happened?

How has it come that there is only one way to speak and one way to think in this little town?

Sadly, this is our new reality. If a person dares to question Ashland’s liberal orthodoxy, or asks the wrong questions, or finds themselves wondering if society is being led to its own destruction by forces masquerading as peace and love, this person will be cast aside in no uncertain terms.

What have we come to when we no longer look at those who disagree with us as real human beings? Is Ashland becoming a dystopia of group think where a person dare not step out of line?

This is not healthy, and this is why I am running for City Council. I hope to be one small voice for reason.

Randy Dolinger

Ashland

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