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FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2018 file photo, Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley speaks at a rally at City Hall in Boston. On Nov. 6, Pressley became Massachusetts' first black woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm, File)

The Latest: National House races

WASHINGTON — The Latest on elections to the U.S. House of Representatives (all times local):

10:35 p.m.

First-time Democratic candidate Jason Crow has defeated five-term Republican Rep. Mike Coffman in suburban Denver.

Crow, 39, is a former Army Ranger and captain who fought in Iraq. He then went to work at a politically-connected Denver law firm before taking on Coffman, who has survived repeated strong Democratic challenges in the diverse district.

Hillary Clinton won the district by nine points in 2016 while Coffman won it by eight.

Coffman is an Army and Marine veteran and is active on veterans' issues. But Crow used his own military service to neutralize Coffman's advantage. Crow also embraced the cause of gun control in a district that was home to the 2012 Aurora theater shooting that killed 12 and abuts Columbine High School, where two teen-aged gunmen killed 13 in 1999.

10:20 p.m.

Democratic newcomer Sharice Davids has defeated incumbent Rep. Kevin Yoder in Kansas to become the nation's first LGBT Native American in Congress.

The 38-year-old activist, lawyer and political newcomer already garnered national attention as part of a crop of diverse Democratic candidates.

Yoder was endorsed by President Donald Trump, but the suburban Kansas City district voted for Democrat Hillary Clinton in 2016. The district is a mix of fast-growing bedroom communities, established suburbs and poorer city neighborhoods.

Davids emerged from a six-person Democratic primary and energized voters and Democratic donors by emphasizing her biography. Her history includes mixed martial arts fights.

She's a member of the Wisconsin-based Ho-Chunk Nation and was raised by a single mother who served in the Army and worked for the U.S. Postal Service.

10:10 p.m.

Democratic businessman Dean Phillips has defeated Republican Rep. Erik Paulsen in a suburban Minnesota district that figures heavily into Democrats' hopes for a House takeover.

Paulsen had easily won elections throughout his five terms in office even as the Minneapolis-area district trended toward Democrats.

But the district favored Hillary Clinton by nearly 10 points two years ago, and a statewide poll late in the race showed Phillips with a comfortable lead. Outside groups poured more than $10 million into the battleground race.

Phillips ran his family's liquor company and started a chain of local coffee shops. He painted Paulsen as too in-step with President Donald Trump, though Paulsen tried to distance himself from the president.

10 p.m.

Democrat Debbie Mucarsel-Powell has defeated Republican Rep. Carlos Curbelo in Florida, the second GOP incumbent House member to fall. Curbelo, a moderate and critic of President Donald Trump, was trying to defy the political winds against Trump in the South Florida district.

Mucarsel-Powell is an immigrant from Ecuador who has worked for several nonprofit organizations in Miami-Dade County. She ran on preventing gun violence and protecting the environment, but her main focus was on health care and the Affordable Care Act, which Curbelo voted to repeal.

Mucarsel-Powell painted Curbelo as a politician who talks like a moderate but tends to vote with conservatives.

Curbelo is a leader of the bipartisan Climate Caucus and bucked GOP leadership this summer by supporting a tax on emissions of carbon dioxide, a contributor to global warming.

9:20 p.m.

Democrat Ayanna Pressley has completed her quest to become Massachusetts' first black woman elected to Congress.

Pressley is also the first African-American to serve on the Boston City Council. She sailed through Tuesday's general election to Congress unopposed, two months after unseating 10-term Rep. Michael Capuano in a primary that was a national political stunner.

With no Republican in the race in the heavily Democratic district, her upset victory in the primary had all but assured Pressley the House seat, with only the remote possibility of a write-in campaign to potentially stop her.

9:00 p.m.

Republican Rep. Andy Barr of Kentucky won a close-fought race that Democrats had targeted in a bid to shift the House to Democratic control.

Barr turned back a strong challenge from Democrat Amy McGrath in a district that supported President Donald Trump two years ago.

McGrath, a retired fighter pilot, gave Barr his toughest test yet as he sought a fourth term. Barr urged voters to re-elect him for his "access and influence with this administration," while McGrath countered with a message of "country over party."

Barr won by 22 points in 2016, but McGrath waged an aggressive challenge, including TV ads showing her in front of fighter jets and with her young children.

The district includes Lexington and capital Frankfort. The seat has switched parties five times since 1978.

8:50 p.m.

In Indiana, Greg Pence, an older brother of Vice President Mike Pence, has won a heavily Republican House seat that his famous sibling once held.

The 61-year-old Pence, an owner of two antique malls, defeated Democrat Jeannine Lee Lake, who publishes a bi-monthly Muncie newspaper.

The eastern Indiana seat is open because Republican Rep. Luke Messer ran in the GOP primary for the Senate. Greg Pence is one of Mike Pence's three brothers.

Greg Pence is a Marine veteran and once ran a now-bankrupt chain of convenience stores.

8:30 p.m.

Republican Rep. Barbara Comstock of Virginia was the first congressional incumbent to lose as voters in her Northern Virginia district expressed their continued dislike of President Donald Trump.

Democratic state Sen. Jennifer Wexton won an easy victory in the wealthy suburban district outside Washington, which Hillary Clinton won by 10 percentage points.

Comstock tried hard to emphasize her independence from Trump, but Wexton, a former prosecutor, portrayed the two-term incumbent as a Trump ally out of touch with the diverse, well-educated district.

Comstock easily beat a Democrat in 2016 when her district went for Clinton.

The national focus on the race helped Comstock and Wexton raise more than $5 million in all, while outside groups spent more than $10 million.

8:25 p.m.

Donna Shalala has won a U.S. House seat in Florida, making her the first Democrat to flip a GOP seat on Tuesday night.

After serving in President Bill Clinton's Cabinet and running major universities, Shalala is starting a third career with her election to the House.

The 77-year-old Democrat won Tuesday in a Miami district that had long been in Republican hands. Shalala has sought to turn her age into a positive by stressing her experience with this slogan: "Ready on Day One."

7:30 p.m.

Polls have closed in several East Coast states as voters decide control of Congress and statehouses across the nation.

A tight Kentucky congressional race in a district President Donald Trump won by double digits could be an early indicator whether the House will shift to Democratic control.

Retired fighter pilot Amy McGrath has given Republican incumbent Andy Barr his toughest test yet as he seeks a fourth term outside Lexington.

In suburban Atlanta, Republican Rep. Karen Handel faced a strong challenge from Lucy McBath, whose 17-year-old son was shot and killed at a gas station.

In Virginia, GOP. Rep. Barbara Comstock was trying to fend off political newcomer Jennifer Wexton, while one-time tea party favorite Rep. Dave Brat faced off against Democrat Abigail Spanberger, a former CIA operative.

2 p.m.

In the battle for control of the House, Democrats are increasingly confident they'll pick up the 23 seats needed to seize control and flip the majority.

They are counting on voter enthusiasm and the strength of their candidates to carry them to victory. More women than ever are running, along with military veterans and minorities, in districts across the country.

Republicans predict they'll lose seats but hold a slim majority based on what they say is a healthy economy.

The midterm elections are typically difficult for the party in power. This year it's become a referendum on President Donald Trump and GOP control of Congress.

House Republicans took control in 2010 during then-President Barack Obama's first term.

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