• GMO Survival Guide

    Tips for navigating the GMO minefield
  • Consumers have learned to recognize and avoid a host of processed-food foes: monosodium glutamate, trans fats, high-fructose corn syrup, myriad preservatives and a variety of "artificial" ingredients.
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    • Foods most likely to contain GMOs
      Fresh corn
      Hawaiian papaya
      Cornmeal
      Cornbread mix
      Puffed corn snacks
      Tortilla chips (including flavored)
      Foods fried in corn, soybean, cottonseed and canola oils
      Soy flour
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      Foods most likely to contain GMOs
      Fresh corn

      Hawaiian papaya

      Cornmeal

      Cornbread mix

      Puffed corn snacks

      Tortilla chips (including flavored)

      Foods fried in corn, soybean, cottonseed and canola oils

      Soy flour

      Veggie sausages

      Meatballs, burgers with soy protein

      Soy-based protein drinks and powders

      Some zucchini and yellow squash

      Foods least likely to contain GMOs

      Anything certified organic

      Anything labeled Non-GMO

      Food that's not processed

      Blue corn products or sweet corn

      Popcorn (this type of corn resists genetic engineering)

      Roma tomatoes

      Potatoes

      Beverages, fruit-flavored foods or candy sweetened with cane sugar instead of high-fructose corn syrup or sugar from beets

      Download a Non-GMO Shopping Guide at www.nongmoshoppingguide.com or the application for smartphones.
  • Consumers have learned to recognize and avoid a host of processed-food foes: monosodium glutamate, trans fats, high-fructose corn syrup, myriad preservatives and a variety of "artificial" ingredients.
    Yet the ultimate Frankenfoods still elude many health-conscious shoppers, even those who routinely read labels. Genetically modified organisms — GMOs — are never identified as such, but they lurk at almost every level of the processed-food industry and morph into an array of foodlike substances, most derived from corn and soybeans. Think deceptively benign terms such as "whey," "malt," "food starch" and "fructose," in addition to the tongue-twisters "methylcellulose," "cyclodextrin" and many more.
    "It's when you get into "… those fractioned parts of corn and soy that the processed-food industry uses "… that's what makes food cheap," says Annie Hoy, outreach manager for Ashland Food Co-op.
    Genetic engineering, the science that creates GMOs, inserts DNA from one species into a different — usually entirely unrelated — species. Among the most infamous examples is the splicing of salmon-scale genes into tomato DNA to yield fruits with stronger skins.
    Scientists' goal is to engineer foods that are easier to grow, more productive, resistant to disease or spoilage or just more visually appealing. These traits cannot transpire outside a laboratory nor via traditional breeding methods and often involve the use of bacteria or viruses in the engineering.
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